Thursday, November 26, 2009

Legal News & Updates

A West Bloomfield man dubbed by the U.S. as the “spam king” was sentenced Monday by a federal judge to more than four years for a stock-fraud scheme that netted him $2.7 million in the summer of 2005. Alan Ralsky, 63, pleaded guilty in June to conspiracy to commit wire fraud, mail fraud and to violating the federal CAN-SPAM Act, which bans misleading subject lines in e-mail and the sending of commercial e-mail messages that appear to be from friends. [Detroit Free Press]
Facebook Photos Cost Woman Her Sick-Leave Benefits- Wow, facebook is really growing and spreading to every sector.

A Canadian woman on sick leave for depression says she lost her benefits after her insurance agent found photos of her apparently having fun on Facebook. Nathalie Blanchard said Monday she was diagnosed with major depression and was receiving monthly sick-leave benefits until payments dried up this fall. When Blanchard called her insurance provider, Manulife, to find out why, she says she was told the Facebook photos showed she was able to work. [SiliconValley.com]
The chief executive of Fox Filmed Entertainment said Monday the U.S. should join France in cutting off the Internet connection of users who repeatedly download copyright-protected films. CEO Jim Gianopulos said Internet piracy is the single biggest threat to the film industry worldwide, and independent films are the hardest hit. [SiliconValley.com]

Volunteers Log Off As Wikipedia Ages- Good..I never was a Wiki fan like many...
Wikipedia.org is the fifth-most-popular Web site in the world, with roughly 325 million monthly visitors. But unprecedented numbers of the millions of online volunteers who write, edit and police it are quitting. Volunteers have been departing the project that bills itself as "the free encyclopedia that anyone can edit" faster than new ones have been joining, and the net losses have accelerated over the past year. In the first three months of 2009, the English-language Wikipedia suffered a net loss of more than 49,000 editors, compared to a net loss of 4,900 during the same period a year earlier. [WSJ]

Articles and brief synopsis from BNA Internet Law News

No comments: